Skip to main content

Do readers use character information when programming return-sweep saccades?

Vasilev, M. R., Adedeji, V. I., Laursen, C., Budka, M. and Slattery, T.J., 2021. Do readers use character information when programming return-sweep saccades? Vision Research, 183 (June), 30-40.

Full text available as:

[img] PDF
1911.00716 (2).pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 February 2022.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

1MB
[img]
Preview
PDF (arXiv. Version 1)
1911.00716v1.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

949kB
[img]
Preview
PDF (arXiv Version 2)
1911.00716v2.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

1MB

DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2021.01.003

Abstract

Reading saccades that occur within a single line of text are guided by the size of letters. However, readers occasionally need to make longer saccades (known as return-sweeps) that take their eyes from the end of one line of text to the beginning of the next. In this study, we tested whether return-sweep saccades are also guided by font size information and whether this guidance depends on visual acuity constraints. To do this, we manipulated the font size of letters (0.29 vs 0.39 deg. per character) and the length of the first line of text (16 vs 26 deg.). The larger font resulted in return-sweeps that landed further to the right of the line start and in a reduction of corrective saccades compared to the smaller font. This suggests that font size information is used when programming return-sweeps and corrective saccades. Return-sweeps in the longer line condition landed further to the right of the line start and the proportion of corrective saccades increased compared to the short line condition. This likely reflects an increase in saccadic range error with the increase in saccade size. Critically, however, there was no interaction between font size and line length. This suggests that when programming return-sweeps, the use of font size information does not depend on visual acuity at the saccade target. Instead, it appears that readers rely on global typographic properties of the text in order to maintain an optimal number of characters to the left of their first fixation on a new line.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0042-6989
Uncontrolled Keywords:q-bio.NC ;q-bio.NC; reading, eye-movements, font size, saccade planning, return-sweeps
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:33005
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:06 Nov 2019 15:05
Last Modified:09 Mar 2021 13:24

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -