Impaired Competence for Pretense in Children with Autism: Exploring Potential Cognitive Predictors.

Bigham, S., 2009. Impaired Competence for Pretense in Children with Autism: Exploring Potential Cognitive Predictors. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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DOI: 10.1007/s10803-009-0820-6

Abstract

Lack of pretense in children with autism has been explained by a number of theoretical explanations, including impaired mentalising, impaired response inhibition, and weak central coherence. This study aimed to empirically test each of these theories. Children with autism (n=60) were significantly impaired relative to controls (n=65) when interpreting pretense, thereby supporting a competence deficit hypothesis. They also showed impaired mentalising and response inhibition, but superior local processing indicating weak central coherence. Regression analyses revealed that mentalising significantly and independently predicted pretense. The results are interpreted as supporting the impaired mentalising theory and evidence against competing theories invoking impaired response inhibition or a local processing bias. The results of this study have important implications for treatment and intervention.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0162-3257
Subjects:Psychology
Group:School of Design, Engineering & Computing
ID Code:10172
Deposited By:Dr Sally Bigham LEFT
Deposited On:05 Jul 2009 11:14
Last Modified:07 Mar 2013 15:09

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