Archaeological reconstruction illustrations: an analysis of the history, development, motivations and current practice of reconstructionil lustration, with recommendations for its future development.

Hodgson, J., 2004. Archaeological reconstruction illustrations: an analysis of the history, development, motivations and current practice of reconstructionil lustration, with recommendations for its future development. PhD Thesis (PhD). Bournemouth University.

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Abstract

Initially, this study examines how archaeological reconstruction drawing evolved into its present form. Its development within the wider context of social and art history is traced from the 15th to the 201h century, with particular attention to its various applications, and the motivations for its production. The result is a clearer understanding and definition of the present role and purposes of this branch of illustration. Secondly,the study examines how these purposes are achieved in contemporary reconstruction artwork. By using an experiment in reconstruction, each component of the process is examined in turn: the design brief,illustrator, illustration and audience. The illustrations produced by the experiment are ranked according to performance, using the aims of the reconstruction as criteria. Aspects are identified which appear to contribute to good performance,using the information obtained about the illustrations and illustrators. Finally, the results are reviewed as a whole to identify present and possible future trends that may be worth exploring, and to inform a set of proposed guidelines for the commissioning and production of archaeological reconstructions. At present, archaeological reconstruction artwork has received very little academic attention, and there appears to be no formal identification of its aims, agenda or working practice. This study provides the groundwork for rectifying this situation, and supplies new information in several dffferent areas.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information:A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement of Bournemouth University for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. If you feel this work infringes your copyright please contact the BURO manager.
Subjects:History
History > Archaeology
Group:School of Applied Sciences
ID Code:11960
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:26 Oct 2009 14:38
Last Modified:07 Mar 2013 15:16

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