Enabling collaborative modelling for a multi-site model-driven software development approach for electronic control units.

Grimm, F., 2012. Enabling collaborative modelling for a multi-site model-driven software development approach for electronic control units. Doctorate Thesis (Doctorate). Bournemouth University, School of Design, Engineering & Computing..

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Abstract

An important aspect of support for distributed work is to enable users at different sites to work collaboratively, across different sites, even different countries but where they may be working on the same artefacts. Where the case is the design of software systems, design models need to be accessible by more than one modeller at a time allowing them to work independently from each other in what can be called a collaborative modelling process supporting parallel evolution. In addition, as such design is a largely creative process users are free to create layouts which appear to better depict their understanding of certain model elements presented in a diagram. That is, that the layout of the model brings meaning which exceed the simple structural or topological connections. However, tools for merging such models tend to do so from a purely structural perspective, thus losing an important aspect of the meaning which was intended to be conveyed by the modeller. This thesis presents a novel approach to model merging which allows the preservation of such layout meaning when merging. It first presents evidence from an industrial study which demonstrates how modellers use layout to convey meanings. An important finding of the study is that diagram layout conveys domain-specific meaning and is important for modellers. This thesis therefore demonstrates the importance of diagram layout in model-based software engineering. It then introduces an approach to merging which allows for the preservation of domain-specific meaning in diagrams of models, and finally describes a prototype tool and core aspects of its implementation.

Item Type:Thesis (Doctorate)
Additional Information:If you feel that this work infringes your copyright please contact the BURO Manager.
Subjects:Generalities > Computer Science and Informatics
Group:UNSPECIFIED
ID Code:20688
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:26 Feb 2013 16:45
Last Modified:29 Apr 2015 13:42

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