Reading text increases binocular disparity in dyslexic children.

Kirkby, J. A., Blythe, H.I., Drieghe, D. and Liversedge, S.P., 2011. Reading text increases binocular disparity in dyslexic children. PLoS ONE, 6 (11).

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kirkby. journal.pone.0027105. reading.pdf - Published Version
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DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0027105


Children with developmental dyslexia show reading impairment compared to their peers, despite being matched on IQ, socio-economic background, and educational opportunities. The neurological and cognitive basis of dyslexia remains a highly debated topic. Proponents of the magnocellular theory, which postulates abnormalities in the M-stream of the visual pathway cause developmental dyslexia, claim that children with dyslexia have deficient binocular coordination, and this is the underlying cause of developmental dyslexia. We measured binocular coordination during reading and a non-linguistic scanning task in three participant groups: adults, typically developing children, and children with dyslexia. A significant increase in fixation disparity was observed for dyslexic children solely when reading. Our study casts serious doubts on the claims of the magnocellular theory. The exclusivity of increased fixation disparity in dyslexics during reading might be a result of the allocation of inadequate attentional and/or cognitive resources to the reading process, or suboptimal linguistic processing per se. © 2011 Kirkby et al.

Item Type:Article
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:21083
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:04 Mar 2014 13:06
Last Modified:10 Sep 2014 14:57


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