Distraction, not hunger, is associated with lower mood and lower perceived work performance on fast compared to non-fast days during intermittent fasting.

Appleton, K. and Baker, S., 2015. Distraction, not hunger, is associated with lower mood and lower perceived work performance on fast compared to non-fast days during intermittent fasting. Journal of Health Psychology, 20 (6), 702 - 711 .

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DOI: 10.1177/1359105315573430

Abstract

Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p < 0.01), and lower perceived work performance was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.50, p < 0.01) and lower positive mood (β = 0.59, p = 0.01). No associations were found with hunger (largest β = -0.11, p = 0.15). Associations between mood, perceived work performance and distraction but not hunger mirror those found in traditional dieting and suggest no benefit for attention from intermittent fasting-type regimes.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1359-1053
Uncontrolled Keywords:cognitive processing ; diet ; eating behaviour ; mood ; weight loss
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:22097
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:17 Jun 2015 15:19
Last Modified:17 Jun 2015 15:19

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