Physical self-perceptions and body composition in fitness instructors, regular exercisers and non-exercisers.

Polman, R. C.J., 2004. Physical self-perceptions and body composition in fitness instructors, regular exercisers and non-exercisers. In: Self-concept, Motivation and Identity: Where to from here?, 1--3 July 2004, Berlin, Germany, 765 - 773 .

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Abstract

This study investigated physical self-perceptions (PSPP and PIP) and the relationship between physical self-perceptions and body composition measures (BMI, WHR, percentage body fat) in fitness instructors (n = 36), regular exercisers (n = 29) and non-exercisers (n = 35). Gender differences were apparent in the physical self-perceptions, males scoring higher on the attractive body, sports competence and physical self-worth sub-scales of the PSPP. Fitness instructors rated their bodily attractiveness, physical condition and physical strength significantly higher and perceived them as more important than the regular and non -exercisers. Also, fitness instructors and regular exercisers had higher levels of physical self-worth and sports competence and perceived sports competence as more important than the non-exercisers. Relationships between physical self-perceptions and body composition were found. For females higher fat percentage or BMI values were negatively associated with most of the sub-domains of the PSPP. It was concluded that participation in regular exercise is associated with more positive physical self- perceptions that might contribute to a ‘life-time’ commitment to exercise participation. Secondly, more longitudinal research is required to investigate the relationship between physical self-perceptions and changes in body composition. Finally, it was suggested that exercise programs should promote competence and should be conducted in a relatively ‘body neutral’ environment. Such an approach would propagate a more intrinsically motivated orientation to exercise participation and might have a more pronounced effect on physical self-perceptions and global physical self-esteem

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:22255
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:22 Jul 2015 09:23
Last Modified:22 Jul 2015 09:23

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