A high omega-3 fatty acid multinutrient supplement benefits cognition and mobility in older women: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot ptudy.

Strike, S., Carlisle, A., Gibson, E. L. and Dyall, S., 2015. A high omega-3 fatty acid multinutrient supplement benefits cognition and mobility in older women: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot ptudy. Journal of Gerontology Medical Sciences.

Full text available as:

[img]
Preview
PDF (OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE)
Strike - Mob Cog DHD - 15 J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

575kB

DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glv109

Abstract

Background. Mobility is a key determinant of frailty in older persons, and a variety of dietary factors, such as the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are positively associated with decreased frailty and improved mobility and cognition in older persons. Methods. The effects of a multinutrient supplement on mobility and cognition were assessed in postmenopausal women (60–84 years). Participants received either Efalex Active 50+ (1 g DHA, 160 mg eicosapentaenoic acid, 240mg Ginkgo biloba, 60mg phosphatidylserine, 20mg d-αtocopherol, 1mg folic acid, and 20μg vitamin B12 per day; N = 15) or placebo (N = 12) for 6 months. Mobility was assessed by VICON 9 motion capture camera system synchronized with Kistler force plates, cognitive performance by computerized cognitive function tests, and blood fatty acid levels by pin-prick analysis. Results. Significant effects of treatment were seen in two of the four cognitive tests, with shorter mean latencies in a motor screening task (p < .05) and more words remembered (p < .03), and one of the three primary mobility measures with improved habitual walking speed (p < .05). Compared with the placebo group, supplementation also resulted in significantly higher blood DHA levels (p < .02). Conclusions. In this pilot study, multinutrient supplementation impro ved cognition and mobility in able older females at clinically relevant levels, suggesting a potential role in reducing the decline to frailty.

Item Type:Article
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:School of Health and Social Care
ID Code:22342
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:13 Aug 2015 14:06
Last Modified:13 Aug 2015 14:06

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -