Color categories only affect post-perceptual processes when same- and different-category colors are equally discriminable.

He, X., Witzel, C., Forder, L., Clifford, A. and Franklin, A., 2014. Color categories only affect post-perceptual processes when same- and different-category colors are equally discriminable. Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 31 (4), A322 - A331 .

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DOI: 10.1364/JOSAA.31.00000A

Abstract

Prior claims that color categories affect color perception are confounded by inequalities in the color space used to equate same- and different-category colors. Here, we equate same- and different-category colors in the number of just-noticeable differences, and measure event-related potentials (ERPs) to these colors on a visual oddball task to establish if color categories affect perceptual or post-perceptual stages of processing. Category effects were found from 200 ms after color presentation, only in ERP components that reflect post-perceptual processes (e.g., N2, P3). The findings suggest that color categories affect post-perceptual processing, but do not affect the perceptual representation of color.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1084-7529
Uncontrolled Keywords:Color ; Color Perception ; Discrimination (Psychology) ; Electroencephalography ; Evoked Potentials ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Young Adult
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:22609
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:07 Oct 2015 09:18
Last Modified:07 Oct 2015 09:18

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