Lingering misinterpretations of garden path sentences arise from competing syntactic representations.

Slattery, T., Sturt, P., Christianson, K., Yoshida, M. and Ferreira, F., 2013. Lingering misinterpretations of garden path sentences arise from competing syntactic representations. Journal of Memory and Language, 69 (2), 104 - 120 .

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DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2013.04.001

Abstract

Recent work has suggested that readers 19 initial and incorrect interpretation of temporarily ambiguous ("garden path") sentences (e.g., Christianson, Hollingworth, Halliwell, & Ferreira, 2001) sometimes lingers even after attempts at reanalysis. These lingering effects have been attributed to incomplete reanalysis. In two eye tracking experiments, we distinguish between two types of incompleteness: the language comprehension system might not build a faithful syntactic structure, or it might not fully erase the structure built during an initial misparse. The first experiment used reflexive binding and the Gender Mismatch paradigm to show that a complete and faithful structure is built following processing of the garden-path. The second experiment used two-sentence texts to examine the extent to which the garden-path meaning from the first sentence interferes with reading of the second. Together, the results indicate that misinterpretation effects are attributable not to failure in building a proper structure, but rather to failure in cleaning up all remnants of earlier attempts to build that syntactic representation.

Item Type:Article
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:22639
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:13 Oct 2015 09:36
Last Modified:13 Oct 2015 09:36

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