The transfer and fate of Pb from sewage sludge amended soil in a multi-trophic food chain: a comparison with the labile elements Cd and Zn.

Dar, M. I., Khan, F. A., Green, I. D. and Naikoo, M. I., 2015. The transfer and fate of Pb from sewage sludge amended soil in a multi-trophic food chain: a comparison with the labile elements Cd and Zn. Environmental Science and Pollution Research.

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ESPR manuscript ESPR-D-15-01915.pdf - Accepted Version

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DOI: 10.1007/s11356-015-4836-5

Abstract

The contamination of agroecosystems due to the presence of trace elements in commonly used agricultural materials is a serious issue. The most contaminated material is usually sewage sludge, and the sustainable use of this material within agriculture is a major concern. This study addresses a key issue in this respect, the fate of trace metals applied to soil in food chains. The work particularly addresses the transfer of Pb, which is an understudied element in this respect, and compares the transfer of Pb with two of the most labile metals, Cd and Zn. The transfer of these elements was determined from sludge-amended soils in a food chain consisting of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), the mustard aphid (Lipaphis erysimi) and a predatory beetle (Coccinella septempunctata). The soil was amended with sludge at rates of 0, 5, 10 and 20 % (w/w). Results showed that Cd was readily transferred through the food chain until the predator trophic level. Zn was the most readily transferred element in the lower trophic levels, but transfer to aphids was effectively restricted by the plant regulating shoot concentration. Pb had the lowest level of transfer from soil to shoot and exhibited particular retention in the roots. Nevertheless, Pb concentrations were significantly increased by sludge amendment in aphids, and Pb was increasingly transferred to ladybirds as levels increased. The potential for Pb to cause secondary toxicity to organisms in higher trophic levels may have therefore been underestimated.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0944-1344
Uncontrolled Keywords:Aphid ; Food chain ; Ladybird ; Plant ; Sewage sludge ; Trace metal
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:22683
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:16 Oct 2015 09:34
Last Modified:14 Jun 2016 01:08

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