Context matters: Student-perceived binge drinking norms at faculty-level relate to binge drinking behavior in higher education.

Van Damme, J., Hublet, A., De Clercq, B., McAlaney, J., Van Hal, G., Rosiers, J., Maes, L. and Clays, E., 2016. Context matters: Student-perceived binge drinking norms at faculty-level relate to binge drinking behavior in higher education. Addictive Behaviors, 59 (August), 89 - 94.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.03.011

Abstract

Background: Binge drinking in higher education is an important problem. To target binge drinking in students it is necessary to study the social context of students. Faculties (i.e., colleges or schools in Northern American education) are social contexts in which students behave, but little is known about how the faculty structure relates to monthly binge drinking. This study investigates the relationship with student-perceived binge drinking norms at faculty-level in addition to known personal determinants. Methods: Data were collected in 7181 students within 22 faculty-level units, using an anonymous online survey. Multilevel analyses were used to investigate the relationship of both individual-level determinants (e.g., perceived norms, social drinking motives) and student-perceived binge drinking norms at faculty-level on monthly binge drinking. Results: Two-third (62.2%) of the sample were female and the mean age was 21.06 (SD = 2.85) years. In males, significant faculty-level variance in monthly binge drinking was found. At faculty-level, only same-sex student-perceived binge drinking norms showed a positive relationship (OR = 2.581; 95%CI = [1.023,6.509]). At individual level, both opposite- and same-sex perceived binge drinking norms, and social drinking motives positively related to monthly binge drinking. In females, no significant faculty-level variance was found. Only individual-level determinants positively related to monthly binge drinking. No cross-level interactions were found. Conclusion: Besides individual determinants, especially in men, faculties are relevant environmental structures and networks to take into account when targeting binge drinking in higher education.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0306-4603
Uncontrolled Keywords:Social environment; Student; Binge drinking; Peer group; University; Perceived nor
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science and Technology
ID Code:23574
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:16 May 2016 11:54
Last Modified:16 May 2016 11:54

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