Where is Nepal in the Demographic Transition within the Wider Context of the Nutrition Transition?

Subedi, Y.P., Simkhada, P. and Van Teijlingen, E., 2016. Where is Nepal in the Demographic Transition within the Wider Context of the Nutrition Transition? Open Journal of Social Sciences, 4 (5), 155 - 166.

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DOI: 10.4236/jss.2016.45019

Abstract

Historically, the process of nutrition transition begins with the shifts in demographic transition, moving away from high to low mortality, high to low fertility, high percentage of young population to high proportion of elderly population, high to low population growth rate; and short to long life expectancy at birth. The objective is to identify where Nepal is in demographic transition and whether demographic transition is considered as one of the proximate covariates of nutrition transition. Nepal’s position in the demographic transition has been identified by using Popkin’s framework which is scaled from Pattern I to Pattern V. The time series trends indicated that new patterns of demographic transition have been observed during 1995-2010, which is similar to the pattern IV of the nutrition transition as described by Popkin. Before 1970, the death rates were fluctuating around 30 to 50 deaths per thousand populations. The birth rate per thousand populations was more than 44, which was really high. Both fertility and mortality appear to start declining from 1970. During 1995-2010, birth rate declined from 38 to 24 per thousand populations. The time series trends indicated that new patterns of demographic transition have been observed during 1990-2010, which is similar to the transition between Pattern III and IV of the nutrition transition. Nepal is a country with faster declined in mortality followed by fertility decline, increasing life expectancy above 60 years, decreasing age-structure of below 15 years of population, increasing trends of urban population and beginning of large scale international migration. It may be concluded from above evidences that Nepal is across the new pattern of transition after 1990s in the demographic transition including the increasing risk of chronic diseases of elderly people related to excess consumption of fat, sugar and process foods.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:2327-5952
Uncontrolled Keywords:Progress ; South Asia ; Development ; Nutrition ; Macro Economics
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:School of Health and Social Care
ID Code:23749
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:26 May 2016 13:05
Last Modified:26 May 2016 13:05

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