Benefits of belonging: experimental manipulation of social inclusion to enhance psychological and physiological health parameters.

Begen, F.M. and Turner-Cobb, J., 2015. Benefits of belonging: experimental manipulation of social inclusion to enhance psychological and physiological health parameters. Psychology and Health, 30 (5), 568 - 582.

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DOI: 10.1080/08870446.2014.991734

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Acute changes in social belonging are important triggers for alterations in health and well-being, yet research has emphasised the negative effects of 'exclusion' at the expense of evaluating the potentially positive effects of 'inclusion'. This study examined the impact of acute belonging on physiological and psychological outcomes. DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A healthy population (N = 138) were randomly allocated to 'included' or 'excluded' conditions. Condition-dependent differences in pre/during-task heart rate and pre/post-task self-reports of negative/positive mood, and social self-esteem, were assessed. RESULTS: Included participants showed decreased heart rate and negative mood, and increased social self-esteem. No inclusion-related change in positive mood was shown. An increase in heart rate was observed in excluded participants though no changes in negative/positive mood or social self-esteem were shown. Shifts in social self-esteem acted as a mechanism through which inclusion/exclusion impacted upon negative and positive mood alterations. Results remained significant in presence of covariates (sex, global self-esteem, rumination and social anxiety). CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that acting to enhance belonging through 'inclusion' resulted in adaptive physiological and psychological outcomes. Neutral and potentially protective responses were observed in the immediate aftermath of 'exclusion'. Self-esteem served as one route through which these effects were transmitted.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0887-0446
Uncontrolled Keywords:belonging ; heart rate ; inclusion ; mood ; self-esteem ; Affect ; Female ; Heart Rate ; Humans ; Male ; Self Concept ; Self Report ; Social Distance ; Young Adult
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:24662
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:31 Aug 2016 13:09
Last Modified:31 Aug 2016 13:09

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