How does Cage Cricket enhance the perceived life experience of people with dementia and their care partners? (Abstract).

Fisher, R. and Hicks, B., 2017. How does Cage Cricket enhance the perceived life experience of people with dementia and their care partners? (Abstract). In: Alzheimer Europe, 31 October-2 November 2016, Copenhagen Denmark.

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Abstract

Traditional discourses, based predominantly within biomedical constructions, depict dementia as a tragedy that inflicts loss and despair on those affected by it. Psychosocial interventions and leisure activities have been shown to improve the well-being and quality of life of both community-dwelling people with dementia and their care partners as well as challenge the ‘tragedy discourse.’ Cage Cricket is one such innovative community psychosocial initiative that is receiving numerous National awards throughout the UK for its ability to enable everyone, regardless of background, gender, race or ability, the opportunity to participate in a game that promotes health, social and educational benefits for players. Until recently, however, no research existed that explores the use of this game with community-dwelling people with dementia and their care partners. Working with Dementia Hampshire and Cage 4All, a research team from Bournemouth University Dementia Institute (BUDI) undertook a pilot study to explore the feasibility of using Cage Cricket with people with dementia and examine the perceived impact on their well-being. 12 people with dementia and their care partners participated in two games of Cage Cricket. Perceived outcomes were measured using a mixed method approach consisting of pre and post event questionnaires, observations and focus group discussions. The findings revealed potential benefits for people with dementia and their care partners and highlighted areas for consideration if the games were to be promoted more widely among this population of people.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Leisure ; Dementia ; Health ; Exercise
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:24699
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:21 Sep 2016 13:59
Last Modified:23 Nov 2016 15:22

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