The maturation of interference suppression and response inhibition: ERP analysis of a cued Go/Nogo task.

Renshaw-Vuillier, L., Bryce, D., Szucs, D. and Whitebread, D., 2016. The maturation of interference suppression and response inhibition: ERP analysis of a cued Go/Nogo task. PLoS One, 11 (11), e0165697.

Full text available as:

[img]
Preview
PDF
PLOS One.Gonogo.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

473kB
[img]
Preview
PDF (OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE)
journal.pone.0165697.PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

2MB

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165697

Abstract

Traditional cognitive models of binge-eating behaviour in bulimia nervosa (BN) have long emphasised the importance of weight/shape concern and calorific restriction. However, the traditional cognitive framework continues to neglect the role of negative emotions, despite a growing body of alternative contemporary research suggesting binge-eating behaviour may develop as a mechanism for dealing with stress and negative emotionality. The current study investigated the unique contributions of emotional experience and emotion dysregulation to binge-eating behaviour in females with varying self-reported eating disorder (ED) characteristics. 79 females completed questionnaires measuring ED characteristics (EDE-Q), emotional experience (AIM and TAS-20), and emotion regulation difficulties (DERS and ERQ). 36 participants (11 meeting clinical criteria for BN and 5 for BED) had binged at least once in the past 28 days and 43 (none of whom met clinical ED criteria) had not binged. Results showed that those who binged at least once in the past 28 days (regardless of BN) had more difficulties identifying and describing their feelings, experienced emotions with higher intensity and had more difficulties regulating their emotions than females who had not binged. Deficits in emotional introspection, description and regulation predicted binge-eating behaviour. Overall, whilst a traditional framework (weight/shape concern and calorific restriction) did explain some of the variance in binge-eating behaviour in the current sample, the model significantly improved once emotional regulation was added. These results suggest emotionality should not be neglected as a predictor of binge-eating, with important implications for treatment in disorders like BN.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1932-6203
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:24870
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:24 Oct 2016 08:16
Last Modified:22 Nov 2016 13:18

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -