Exploring Slacktivism; Does The Social Observability of Online Charity Participation Act as a Mediator of Future Behavioural Intentions?

Hogben, J. and Cownie, F., 2017. Exploring Slacktivism; Does The Social Observability of Online Charity Participation Act as a Mediator of Future Behavioural Intentions? Journal of Promotional Communications. (In Press)

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Abstract

This study investigates whether the social observability of online charitable participation influences future interactions with the same charity. The rise of ‘slacktivism’ contributes to the significance of this study. ‘Slactivism’ comprises low-risk, low-cost, online activities, used to raise awareness, produce change, or primarily grant satisfaction to the person engaged in the activity. Contrasting views exist about slacktivism and the effectiveness of online activities such as social-media campaigns; as to whether they yield committed supporters or are merely a method used to enhance the participants’ social self-image. This study is unique in that it links together ideas about slacktivism and impression management. The study revealed that consumers are wising up to charity campaigns on social-media, with many questioning their effectiveness. The perception of others is important although most consumers are reluctant to admit it about themselves: social pressure plays a large role in the participation of slacktivism.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Slacktivism ; online participation ; charities ; not-for-profit
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Media & Communication
ID Code:24947
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:14 Nov 2016 12:58
Last Modified:14 Nov 2016 12:58

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