Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender.

Franklin, E., Diaz, A., Evans, D., Thornton, A. and Moody, C., 2017. Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 11 (1), pp. 79-88.

Full text available as:

[img] PDF
proofs_14_11_16.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

424kB
[img]
Preview
PDF (OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE-SPRINGER COMPACT)
art_10.1007_s11829-016-9468-2-1.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

982kB

DOI: 10.1007/s11829-016-9468-2

Abstract

Invasive carnivorous plant species can impact the native invertebrate communities on which they prey. This article explores the predation of native UK bumblebees (Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant species Sarracenia purpurea and discusses the potential effect of S. purpurea on native bumblebees. Specifically, it evaluates whether the extent to which bumblebees are captured varies (i) over successive years, (ii) across June and July, (iii) with density of distribution of pitchers or (iv) with bumblebee gender. Pitcher contents were examined from an established population of Sarracenia purpurea growing in Dorset, UK. Results show that the total extent to which bumblebees were captured differed over the years 2012–2014 inclusive. A 1-year study in 2013 showed that more bumblebees were caught in July than in June and more bumblebees were captured when pitchers grew at high density. Results from 2013 also showed that more pitchers caught more than one bumblebee than would be expected based on a normal probability distribution and that this phenomenon affects female and male bumblebees equally. We discuss possible reasons for these results including that the bumblebees may be using S. purpurea as a resource. Further work is required to establish the exact underpinning mechanisms and the relative roles of plant and bumblebee behaviour within the relationship. Such interaction complexity may have consequences for consideration in invasive carnivorous plant management.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1872-8855
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pitcher plants; Bumblebees; Invasive Pollinators
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:25001
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:29 Nov 2016 11:25
Last Modified:13 Mar 2017 14:56

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -