Digital Politics: Mobilization, Engagement, and Participation.

Koc-Michalska, K. and Lilleker, D., 2016. Digital Politics: Mobilization, Engagement, and Participation. Political Communication, 1 - 5. (In Press)

Full text available as:

[img] PDF
introduction_KKM+DGL+KKM-2.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 26 April 2018.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

364kB

DOI: 10.1080/10584609.2016.1243178

Abstract

The article provides insights into the driving forces that underpin new forms of political participation. Digital technologies offer opportunities for engaging in a wide range of civicallyoriented activities, each of which can contribute to deeper democratic engagement. Conventional acts of political participation are argued to be driven primarily by intrinsic motivations relating to self-efficacy and empowerment with participants feeling they can have influence over decision makers. Little research explores whether similar motivations drive participation in less conventional acts, as well as whether mobilisation attempts via social media by peers or political organisations mediate those motivations. Drawing on data from a survey among a representative sample of the UK electorate, we find the offline and online spheres of agency remain fairly distinct. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations both matter but extrinsic motivations have the strongest explanatory power independent of the sphere of activity. The mediating effect of mobilisation tactics has a minimal effect on extrinsic motivations, online or offline, but online intrinsic motivations lose their explanatory power. As intrinsic factors offer little explanatory power some forms of online political participation may lack meaning to the individual. Rather, these non-conventional acts result from reward seeking and are more likely to be encouraged by non-governmental campaigning organizations suggesting social media users are most likely to perform simple acts in support of non-contentious causes.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1058-4609
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
Group:Faculty of Media & Communication
ID Code:26111
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:09 Jan 2017 09:37
Last Modified:11 Jan 2017 12:56

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -