Social distance between local residents and African-American expatriates in the context of Ghana's slavery-based heritage tourism.

Yankholmes, A. and Timothy, D.J., 2017. Social distance between local residents and African-American expatriates in the context of Ghana's slavery-based heritage tourism. International Journal of Tourism Research. (In Press)

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DOI: 10.1002/jtr.2121

Abstract

This paper explores the social distance between local residents and African-Americans who have settled in Ghana since the 1960s. Data generated from in-depth interviews suggest the African-American expatriates felt their proximity to collective slave memory or particularly slavery heritage conferred on them certain rights to exclude local residents who are more susceptible to forgetting the past. By appropriating traces of the past, the African-American expatriates provide a range of tourism services, albeit to visitors they believed subscribed to socially constructed meanings elicited at slave sites. The study suggests explicit recognition of African-American expatriates in the levels of contestations that result from slavery-based heritage tourism.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1099-2340
Group:Faculty of Management
ID Code:29097
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:26 Apr 2017 09:20
Last Modified:26 Apr 2017 09:20

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