Sad people are more accurate at expression identification with a smaller own-ethnicity bias than happy people.

Hills, P.J. and Hill, D.M., 2017. Sad people are more accurate at expression identification with a smaller own-ethnicity bias than happy people. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1 - 30. (In Press)

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DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2017.1350869

Abstract

Sad individuals perform more accurately at face identity recognition (Hills, Werno, & Lewis, 2011), possibly because they scan more of the face during encoding. During expression identification tasks, sad individuals do not fixate on the eyes as much as happier individuals (Wu, Pu, Allen, & Pauli, 2012). Fixating on features other than the eyes leads to a reduced own-ethnicity bias (Hills & Lewis, 2006). This background indicates that sad individuals would not view the eyes as much as happy individuals and this would result in improved expression recognition and a reduced own-ethnicity bias. This prediction was tested using an expression identification task, with eye tracking. We demonstrate that sad-induced participants show enhanced expression recognition and a reduced own-ethnicity bias than happy-induced participants due to scanning more facial features. We conclude that mood affects eye movements and face encoding by causing a wider sampling strategy and deeper encoding of facial features diagnostic for expression identification.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1747-0218
Uncontrolled Keywords:Mood induction ; depression ; eye tracking ; face recognition ; happiness ; own-ethnicity bias ; sadness
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:29493
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:24 Jul 2017 10:51
Last Modified:24 Jul 2017 10:51

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