Interplay between n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the endocannabinoid system in brain protection and repair.

Dyall, S., 2017. Interplay between n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the endocannabinoid system in brain protection and repair. Lipids. (In Press)

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/journal/11745

Abstract

The brain is enriched in arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) of the n-6 and n-3 series, respectively. Both are essential for optimal brain development and function. Dietary enrichment with DHA and other long-chain n-3 PUFA, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have shown beneficial effects on learning and memory, neuroinflammatory processes and synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. ARA, DHA and EPA are precursors to a diverse repertoire of bioactive lipid mediators, including endocannabinoids. The endocannabinoid system comprises cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, and their biosynthetic and degradation enzymes. Anandamide (AEA) and 2-archidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are the most widely studied endocannabinoids, and are both derived from phospholipid-bound ARA. The endocannabinoid system also has well established roles in neuroinflammation, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, suggesting an overlap in the neuroprotective effects observed with these different classes of lipids. Indeed, growing evidence suggests a complex interplay between n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA and the endocannabinoid system. For example, long-term DHA and EPA supplementation reduces AEA and 2-AG levels, with reciprocal increases in levels of the analogous endocannabinoid-like DHA and EPA-derived molecules. This review summarises current evidence of this interplay and discusses the therapeutic potential for brain protection and repair.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0024-4201
Uncontrolled Keywords:endocannabinoid system; neurogenesis; neuroinflammation; omega-3 fatty acids; omega-6 fatty acids
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:29626
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:04 Sep 2017 10:28
Last Modified:04 Sep 2017 10:28

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