Tar sands or scar sands: the oil sands are a huge benefit to the Canadian economy but is this at the expense of the environment that is left behind for future generations?

Farmer, J., 2017. Tar sands or scar sands: the oil sands are a huge benefit to the Canadian economy but is this at the expense of the environment that is left behind for future generations? Masters Thesis (Masters). Bournemouth University.

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Abstract

Crude oil is an essential resource for the world. About 40% of the world’s total supply of energy, and 95% of the energy used in the transportation industry comes from oil and with global consumption of oil increasing to record highs, and conventional sources of oil dwindling, this makes unconventional sources of oil like the tar sands seem more economically appealing. Canada’s tar sands are in an advantageous and unique position. As the biggest deposit of unconventional oil and gas in the world and sitting in a politically stable source country, there is vast international interest in these reserves. But nevertheless extracting oil from tar sands requires more energy than conventional drilling, meaning more greenhouse gases are emitted before the oil reaches the end user. This in turn creates a host of environmental consequences for the surrounding areas and globally and health and human rights concerns for First Nations. Producing approximately 96 million barrels per day, and with global oil demand continuing to grow, these reserves are being increasingly exploited. Mechanisms must therefore be in place to ensure sustainable use of these controversial reserves and thought should be given to the needs of current and future generations, as well as preserving the natural environment which may be affected as a result of tar sand production.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information:If you feel that this work infringes your copyright please contact the BURO Manager.
Uncontrolled Keywords:tar sands; oil sands; sustainable development; first nations; ecocide; intergenerational equity; renewable energy; environmental law; environmental justice; fort mcmurray
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:29631
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:30 Aug 2017 09:29
Last Modified:30 Aug 2017 09:29

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