Changes in appetite, energy intake, body composition, and circulating ghrelin constituents during an incremental trekking ascent to high altitude.

Matu, J., O'Hara, J., Hill, N., Clarke, S., Boos, C., Newman, C., Holdsworth, D., Ispoglou, T., Duckworth, L., Woods, D., Mellor, A. and Deighton, K., 2017. Changes in appetite, energy intake, body composition, and circulating ghrelin constituents during an incremental trekking ascent to high altitude. European journal of applied physiology, 117 (9), 1917 - 1928.

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DOI: 10.1007/s00421-017-3683-0

Abstract

Purpose Circulating acylated ghrelin concentrations are associated with altitude-induced anorexia in laboratory environments, but have never been measured at terrestrial altitude. This study examined time course changes in appetite, energy intake, body composition, and ghrelin constituents during a high-altitude trek. Methods Twelve participants [age: 28(4) years, BMI 23.0(2.1) kg m−2] completed a 14-day trek in the Himalayas. Energy intake, appetite perceptions, body composition, and circulating acylated, des-acylated, and total ghrelin concentrations were assessed at baseline (113 m, 12 days prior to departure) and at three fixed research camps during the trek (3619 m, day 7; 4600 m, day 10; 5140 m, day 12). Results Relative to baseline, energy intake was lower at 3619 m (P = 0.038) and 5140 m (P = 0.016) and tended to be lower at 4600 m (P = 0.056). Appetite perceptions were lower at 5140 m (P = 0.027) compared with baseline. Acylated ghrelin concentrations were lower at 3619 m (P = 0.046) and 4600 m (P = 0.038), and tended to be lower at 5140 m (P = 0.070), compared with baseline. Des-acylated ghrelin concentrations did not significantly change during the trek (P = 0.177). Total ghrelin concentrations decreased from baseline to 4600 m (P = 0.045). Skinfold thickness was lower at all points during the trek compared with baseline (P ≤ 0.001) and calf girth decreased incrementally during the trek (P = 0.010). Conclusions Changes in plasma acylated and total ghrelin concentrations may contribute to the suppression of appetite and energy intake at altitude, but differences in the time course of these responses suggest that additional factors are also involved. Interventions are required to maintain appetite and energy balance during trekking at terrestrial altitudes.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1439-6319
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ghrelin ; Hypoxia ; Altitude-induced anorexia ; Terrestrial altitude
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:29936
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:01 Nov 2017 11:07
Last Modified:01 Nov 2017 11:07

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