Introductions of non-native fishes into a heavily modified river: rates, patterns and management issues in the Paranapanema River (Upper Paraná Ecoregion, Brazil).

Garcia, D.A.Z., Britton, J.R., Vidotto-Magnoni, A.P. and Orsi, M., 2017. Introductions of non-native fishes into a heavily modified river: rates, patterns and management issues in the Paranapanema River (Upper Paraná Ecoregion, Brazil). Biological Invasions. (In Press)

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DOI: 10.1007%2Fs10530-017-1623-x

Abstract

Understanding the pathways and impacts of non-native species is important for helping prevent new introductions and invasions. This is frequently challenging in regions where human activities continue to promote new introductions, such as in Brazil, where aquaculture and sport fishing are mainly dependent on non-native fishes. Here, the non-native fish diversity of the Paranapanema River basin of the Upper Paraná River Ecoregion, Brazil was quantified fully for the first time. This river has been subject to considerable habitat alteration through hydroelectric dam construction and concomitant development of aquaculture and sport fishing. Through compilation of a non-native fish inventory by literature review, with complementary records from recent field studies, analyses were completed on the timings of introduction, and the taxonomy, origin and introduction vectors of the fishes. A total of 47 non-native fish are now present across the basin. Of these, 24 invaded from the Lower Paraná River following construction of Itaipu Dam that connected previously unconnected fish assemblages. Activities including fish stocking, aquaculture and sport angling continue to result in new introductions. Discounting Itaipu invasions, the introduction rate between 1950 and 2014 was approximately one new introduction every three years. Introduced fish were mainly of the Cichlidae and Characidae families; most species were from other South American ecoregions, but fishes of African, Asian, North American and Central American origin were also present. These introductions have substantially modified the river’s fish fauna; when coupled with altered lentic conditions caused by impoundment, this suggests that the river’s native fishes are increasingly threatened.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1387-3547
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biodiversity; Invasion; Aquaculture; Hydroelectric dams; Hydropower.
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:29969
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:13 Nov 2017 15:17
Last Modified:13 Nov 2017 15:17

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