Does Social Presence or the Potential for Interaction reduce Social Gaze in Online Social Scenarios? Introducing the "Live Lab" paradigm.

Gregory, N. J. and Antolin, J., 2018. Does Social Presence or the Potential for Interaction reduce Social Gaze in Online Social Scenarios? Introducing the "Live Lab" paradigm. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. (In Press)

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DOI: 10.1177/1747021818772812

Abstract

Research has shown that people’s gaze is biased away from faces in the real-world but towards them when they are viewed onscreen. Non-equivalent stimulus conditions may have represented a confound in this research however, as participants viewed onscreen stimuli as pre-recordings where interaction was not possible, compared to real-world stimuli which were viewed in real-time where interaction was possible. We assessed the independent contributions of online social presence and ability for interaction on social gaze by developing the “live lab” paradigm. Participants in three groups (N = 132) viewed a confederate either as a) a live webcam stream where interaction was not possible (one-way), b) a live webcam stream where an interaction was possible (two-way) or c) as a prerecording. Potential for interaction, rather than online social presence, was the primary influence on gaze behaviour: Participants in the pre-recorded and one-way conditions looked more to the face than those in the two-way condition, particularly when the confederate made “eye contact”. Fixation durations to the face were shorter when the scene was viewed live, particularly during a bid for eye contact Our findings support the dual function of gaze, but suggest that online social presence alone is not sufficient to activate social norms of civil inattention. Implications for the reinterpretation of previous research are discussed.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1747-0218
Uncontrolled Keywords:social attention; mere presence; social presence; faces; eye movements
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:30611
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:27 Apr 2018 16:20
Last Modified:04 Jul 2018 13:31

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