What is diabulimia and what are the implications for practice?

Chelvanayagam, S. and James, J., 2018. What is diabulimia and what are the implications for practice? British Journal of Nursing, 27 (17), 980 - 986.

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DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.980

Abstract

Diabulimia has become a common term used to describe a condition when a person with type 1 diabetes has an eating disorder. The individual may omit or restrict their insulin dose to lose/control weight. Evidence suggests that as many as 20% of women with type 1 diabetes may have this condition. The serious acute and long-term complications of hyperglycaemia are well documented. Detection of this condition is challenging and health professionals need to be vigilant in assessing reasons for variable glycaemic control and weight changes. Management requires a collaborative response from the specialist diabetes team in conjunction with the mental health team. Nurses must ensure that they are aware that the condition may be possible in all patients with type 1 diabetes but especially younger female patients. These patients require timely intervention to prevent any severe acute or long-term complications.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0966-0461
Additional Information:This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in British Journal of Nursing, copyright © MA Healthcare, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.980
Uncontrolled Keywords:Body weight ; Diabetes mellitus type 1 ; Feeding and eating disorders ; Hyperglycaemia ; Insulin
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:31284
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:27 Sep 2018 15:38
Last Modified:27 Sep 2018 15:38

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