Blood Pressure and Hypertension in Adults Permanently Living at High Altitude: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatta, Y.K.D. and Mann, S., 2016. Blood Pressure and Hypertension in Adults Permanently Living at High Altitude: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. High Altitude Medicine and Biology, 17 (3), 185 - 193.

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DOI: 10.1089/ham.2015.0118

Abstract

Aryal, Nirmal, Mark Weatherall, Yadav Kumar Deo Bhatta, and Stewart Mann. Blood pressure and hypertension in adults permanently living at high altitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis. High Alt Med Biol. 17:185-193, 2016.-The objective of this study was to estimate the associations between altitude and mean blood pressure (BP) (or prevalence of hypertension [HT]) in adults who live permanently at high altitude. A literature search was conducted in December 2014 using PubMed, Scopus, and OvidSP (MedLine and EMBASE) databases to identify relevant observational studies. Inclusion criteria were reports of studies in populations permanently living at an altitude of ≥2400 m and in those 18 years or older. Meta-regression was used to estimate the association between average BP and HT and altitude. We identified 3375 articles and inclusion criteria were met for 21 reports, which included a total of 40,854 participants. Random-effects meta-regression estimated that for every 1000 m elevation the average systolic BP (SBP) (95% confidence interval [CI]) increased by 17 mmHg (0.2 to 33.8), p = 0.05 and diastolic BP (DBP) by 9.5 mmHg (0.6 to 18.4), p = 0.04 in participants with Tibetan origin. By contrast, in participants with non-Tibetan origin, average SBP decreased by 5.9 mmHg (-19.1 to 7.3), p = 0.38 and DBP by 4 mmHg (-13 to 5), p = 0.38. The odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with HT per 1000 m increment in the altitude were 2.01 (0.37 to 11.02), p = 0.446 and 4.05 (0.07 to 244.69), p = 0.489 for Tibetan and non-Tibetan participants, respectively. Sensitivity analysis excluding two studies with older participants (≥60 years) reversed the direction of this effect in non-Tibetans with odds ratio (95% CI) of 0.10 (0.004 to 2.22) per 1000 m, p = 0.143. Overall, this review suggests weak association between BP and altitude in Tibetan origin populations.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1527-0297
Uncontrolled Keywords:Andeans; Tibetans; adult; blood pressure; high altitude; hypertension
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:31340
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:09 Oct 2018 14:28
Last Modified:09 Oct 2018 14:28

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