Blood pressure and hypertension in people living at high altitude in Nepal.

Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatt, Y. K. D. and Mann, S., 2018. Blood pressure and hypertension in people living at high altitude in Nepal. Hypertension research. (In Press)

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Abstract

This study aimed to describe blood pressure (BP) and hypertension (HT) in samples of high altitude populations of Nepal and to explore associations of systolic BP, diastolic BP and HT with altitude. This was a cross-sectional survey among 521 people living at four different altitude levels, all above 2800 m, in the Mustang and Humla districts of Nepal. Data on BP was available for all 521 participants. Systolic and diastolic BP levels were highest at the altitude of 3620 m (the highest area surveyed) but did not consistently increase with altitude. Using the cut-point of ≥140/90 mmHg (systolic/diastolic), the prevalence of HT (or on anti-hypertensive medication) was 46.1%, 40.9%, and 54.5% respectively at 2800 m, 3270 m and 3620 m of Mustang district, and 29.1% at 2890 m of Humla district. In a multivariate model adjusting for potential confounders there was moderate evidence of a relationship between systolic BP and altitude; mean systolic BP increased by 14.1 mmHg (95% CI 2.6 to 25.5), P=0.02 for every 1000 m elevation. Although diastolic BP and the probability for HT (or on anti-hypertensive medication) also tended to increase with increasing altitude levels, there was no evidence of a relationship. In the present study three out of four communities living at higher altitude levels showed a greater prevalence of HT among those aged 30 years or older compared with the overall national data. These findings indicate a probable high risk of raised BP in high altitude populations in Nepal.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0916-9636
Uncontrolled Keywords:adult; blood pressure; high altitude; hypertension; Nepal
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:31415
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:01 Nov 2018 09:34
Last Modified:02 Nov 2018 11:25

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