Romantic involvement and adolescents' academic and psychosocial functioning in Chinese societies.

Liu, X., Huang, C. Y. and Shen, A.C.T., 2019. Romantic involvement and adolescents' academic and psychosocial functioning in Chinese societies. Children and Youth Services Review, 96 (January), 108 - 117.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.036

Abstract

© 2018 This study explores the effects of romantic involvement and dating behaviors on adolescent academic and psychosocial functioning in Chinese societies, where adolescent dating is generally discouraged and believed to generate adverse outcomes. Adolescents (male = 48.6%; MeanAge = 15.20 years) from Taiwan (N = 1081) and mainland China (N = 684) were recruited through stratified sampling to complete self-report surveys on their academic performance, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, relationship status, and gender-role beliefs. Adolescents with current or past dating experiences were also asked about specific dating behaviors, such as the onset of dating, number of relationships, and breakup experiences. Approximately one-third of Chinese adolescents surveyed (34.2%) have past or ongoing dating experience, who showed poorer academic performance compared to never-dated teens. In the full sample, single adolescents with past dating experiences reported greater depressive symptoms than those currently dating or never-dated teens. Boys with past dating experience showed higher self-esteem than their currently dating or never-dated peers, whereas single girls with past dating experience showed lower self-esteem than their currently dating or never-dated counterparts. Among adolescents with dating experience, early dating, over-dating, sexual activities, and breakup experiences can undermine their academic and psychosocial well-being. These findings have significant implications for practice and policy regarding adolescent education and mental health.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0190-7409
Uncontrolled Keywords:Self-esteem; Depression; Adolescent development; Romantic involvement; Dating behavior; Academic performance
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:31547
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:11 Dec 2018 12:47
Last Modified:11 Dec 2018 12:47

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