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Being one of us: Translating expertise into performance benefits following perceived failure.

Rascle, O., Charrier, M., Higgins, N.C., Rees, T., Coffee, P., Le Foll, D. and Cabagno, G., 2019. Being one of us: Translating expertise into performance benefits following perceived failure. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 43 (July), 105-113.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.01.010

Abstract

Is feedback delivered by an expert sufficient to improve performance? In two studies, we tested, following failure, the influence of group membership (ingroup/outgroup) and source expertise (high/low) on the effectiveness of attributional feedback on performance. Results revealed a significant interactive effect, showing an increase of performance only when the source was an expert ingroup member (Study 1). This interaction was replicated on performance and success expectations in Study 2, which were significantly higher for high compared to low expertise ingroup sources. These data suggest that sharing a common identity with those you lead may help convert expert performance advice into real performance benefits.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1469-0292
Uncontrolled Keywords:Social Identity; Source; Source Expertise; Attribution; Feedback
Group:Faculty of Management
ID Code:31630
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:14 Jan 2019 09:42
Last Modified:29 Jan 2019 15:57

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