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Evaluation of RESPOND, a patient-centred program to prevent falls in older people presenting to the Emergency Department with a fall: A randomised controlled trial.

Barker, A., Cameron, P., Flicker, L., Arendts, G., Brand, C., Etherton-Beer, C., Forbes, A., Haines, T., Hill, A-M., Hunter, P., Lowthian, J., Nyman, S., Redfern, J., Smit, D., Waldron, N., Boyle, E., MacDonald, E., Ayton, D., Morello, R. and Hill, K., 2019. Evaluation of RESPOND, a patient-centred program to prevent falls in older people presenting to the Emergency Department with a fall: A randomised controlled trial. PLoS Medicine, 16 (5), e1002807.

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DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002807

Abstract

Background: Falls are a leading reason for older people presenting to the emergency department (ED). Many experience further falls. Little evidence exists to guide secondary prevention in this population. This randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigated whether a 6-month telephone-based patient-centred program—RESPOND—had an effect on falls and fall injuries in older people presenting to the ED after a fall. Methods and findings: Community dwelling people aged 60-90 years presenting to the ED with a fall and planned for discharge home within 72 hours, were recruited from two EDs in Australia. Participants were enrolled if they could walk without hands-on assistance, use a telephone, and were free of cognitive impairment (MMSE>23). Recruitment occurred between 1st April 2014―29th June 2015. Participants were randomised to receive either RESPOND (intervention) or usual care (control). RESPOND comprised: (1 home-based risk assessment; (2) six months telephone-based education, coaching, goal setting and support for evidence-based risk factor management; and (3) linkages to existing services. Primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries in the 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included ED presentations, hospital admissions, fractures, death, falls risk, falls efficacy and quality of life. Assessors blind to group allocation collected outcome data via postal calendars, telephone follow-up, and hospital records. There were 430 people in the primary outcome analysis—217 randomised to RESPOND and 213 to control. Mean age of participants was 73 years, 55% were female. Falls per person-year were 1.15 in the RESPOND group and 1.83 in the control (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.65 [95% CI 0.43 to 0.99]; p=0.042). There was no significant difference in fall injuries (IRR 0.81 [0.51 to 1.29]; p=0.374). The rate of fractures was significantly lower in the RESPOND group compared to the control (0.05 vs. 0.12; IRR 0.37 [95% CI 0.15 to 0.91]; p=0.03) but there was no significant difference in other secondary outcomes between groups: ED presentations, hospitalisations or falls risk, falls efficacy and quality of life. There were two deaths in the RESPOND group and one in the control. No adverse events or unintended harm were reported. Limitations of this study were the high number of drop outs (n=93), over or under reporting of falls, fall injuries and hospitalisations across both groups and the relatively small number of fracture events. Conclusions: In this study, providing a telephone-based, patient-centred falls prevention program reduced falls and fractures, but not fall injuries, in older people presenting to the ED with a fall. Adopting patient-centred strategies into routine clinical practice for falls prevention could offer an opportunity to improve outcomes and reduce falls in patients attending ED.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1549-1277
Additional Information:Funding: This project was funded under the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council’s Partnership Projects funding scheme (project number APP1056802), with financial and in-kind contributions from the following partner organisations: Health Strategy and Networks Branch, Strategic System Policy and Planning, Department of Health, WA; Aged and Continuing Care Directorate, Department of Health, WA; Royal Perth Hospital; Curtin University; The University of Western Australia; The Royal Perth Hospital Medical Research Foundation; Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) Area Rehabilitation and Aged Care Falls Specialist Program; Injury Control Council of Western Australia (ICCWA); The George Institute for Global Health; The Alfred Hospital; Monash University; Integrated Care, Victorian Department of Health. (Note, authors are employees or have affiliations with these partner organisations.) RM, DA, EB, and EM’s salaries were supported by this grant. AB was funded by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (APP1067236). JR was funded by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship Level 2 (APP1143538). JL was funded by an Early Career Fellowship funded by the NHMRC (APP1052442). SRN was funded by a National Institute for Health Research Career Development Fellowship (CDF-2015-08-030)
Uncontrolled Keywords:accidental falls; accident & emergency; patient-centred care; randomised controlled trial; elderly
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:32203
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:29 Apr 2019 10:22
Last Modified:18 Jun 2019 11:25

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