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Assessing patient-reported outcomes for automated insulin delivery systems: the psychometric properties of the INSPIRE measures.

Weissberg-Benchell, J., Shapiro, J.B., Hood, K., Laffel, L.M., Naranjo, D., Miller, K. and Barnard, K., 2019. Assessing patient-reported outcomes for automated insulin delivery systems: the psychometric properties of the INSPIRE measures. Diabetic Medicine, 36 (5), 644 - 652.

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DOI: 10.1111/dme.13930

Abstract

AIM: Participants in clinical trials assessing automated insulin delivery systems report perceived benefits and burdens that reflect their experiences and may predict their likelihood of uptake and continued use of this novel technology. Despite the importance of understanding their perspectives, there are no available validated and reliable measures assessing the psychosocial aspects of automated insulin delivery systems. The present study assesses the initial psychometric properties of the INSPIRE measures, which were developed for youth and adults with Type 1 diabetes, as well as parents and partners. METHODS: Data from 292 youth, 159 adults, 150 parents of youth and 149 partners of individuals recruited from the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange Registry were analysed. Participants completed INSPIRE questionnaires and measures of quality of life, fear of hypoglycaemia, diabetes distress, glucose monitoring satisfaction. Exploratory factor analysis assessed factor structures. Associations between INSPIRE scores and other measures, HbA1c , and technology use assessed concurrent and discriminant validity. RESULTS: Youth, adult, parent and partner measures assess positive expectancies of automated insulin delivery systems. Measures range from 17 to 22 items and are reliable (α = 0.95-0.97). Youth, adult and parent measures are unidimensional; the partner measure has a two-factor structure (perceptions of impact on partners versus the person with diabetes). Measures showed concurrent and discriminant validity. CONCLUSIONS: INSPIRE measures assessing the positive expectancies of automated insulin delivery systems for youth, adults, parents and partners have meaningful factor structures and are internally consistent. The developmentally sensitive INSPIRE measures offer added value as clinical trials test newer systems, systems become commercially available and clinicians initiate using these systems.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0742-3071
Additional Information:Funding Information Leona and Harry Helmsley Charitable Trust
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:32209
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:29 Apr 2019 14:06
Last Modified:29 Apr 2019 14:06

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