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An exploration of women’s experiences of wellbeing and peer support during pregnancy, through attendance at midwife-led aquanatal exercise classes.

Davey, E., 2019. An exploration of women’s experiences of wellbeing and peer support during pregnancy, through attendance at midwife-led aquanatal exercise classes. Doctoral Thesis (Doctoral). Bournemouth University.

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Abstract

This thesis examines my professional midwifery practice interest of aquanatal, by means of a research study anchored within a Professional Doctorate. Clinical midwives promote positive public health messages as a part of pregnancy observation, in order to improve the health and wellbeing for women, babies and families. In addition to support offered by family, friends and work colleagues, pregnant women can be observed networking in social groups and in a variety of community settings. Social connections can augment their personal knowledge directed to preparation for motherhood, by contributing to wellbeing adjustments and to the development of social capital during this life transition. A case study approach explored the experience of women (n=11) who attended a midwife-led aquanatal class. Participant data collected from questionnaire and transcribed focus group audio-recordings aimed to explore their motivation for physical activity during pregnancy, experience of wellbeing and peer support through aquanatal class attendance. Thematic analysis offered the relational perspective of professional midwife support on the development of social reciprocity through networking between peer group members and myself as instructor. Findings suggest that peer support characteristics refine the emotional, influential, and informational attributes for network situations where social support in community settings can supplement health promotion by a clinical midwife. The participants experience of wellbeing during the transition to becoming a mother emerged as being negotiated within the interrelationship of biological, social, psychological and ecological systems of pregnancy. Knowledge gained from this study can be used to inform the practice development element of the Professional Doctorate by midwives and maternity care professionals exploring and developing ways to promote strategies for peer support during childbearing in a range of contemporary settings.

Item Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Additional Information:If you feel that this work infringes your copyright please contact the BURO Manager.
Uncontrolled Keywords:aquanatal; pregnancy peer support; pregnancy wellbeing
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:32630
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:07 Aug 2019 08:44
Last Modified:07 Aug 2019 08:44

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