Skip to main content

Locating oneself in the past to influence the present: Impacts of Neolithic landscapes on mental health well-being.

Heaslip, V., Vahdaninia, M., Hind, M., Darvill, T., Staelens, Y., O'Donoghue, D., Drysdale, L., Lunt, S., Hogg, C., Allfrey, M., Clifton, B. and Sutcliffe, T., 2020. Locating oneself in the past to influence the present: Impacts of Neolithic landscapes on mental health well-being. Health and Place, 62 (March), 102273.

Full text available as:

[img] PDF
Heaslip et al.2019-Health&Place.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 20 June 2021.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

413kB
[img] Microsoft Word (Document author submitted to repository)
Clear Copy for Internal Repositry.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

202kB

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102273

Abstract

There are well-established links between mental health and the environment. Mental illness is a global issue, and international policies increasingly focus on promoting mental health well-being through community-based approaches, including non-clinical initiatives such as therapeutic landscapes and the use of heritage assets. However, the empirical evidence-base for the impact of such initiatives is limited. This innovative study, known as Human Henge, used a mixed-methods approach to investigate the impact of immersive experiences of prehistoric landscapes on the well-being of participants with mental health issues. Uniquely, the study followed participants for a year after their participation in the project to explore the long-term impact of their experiences on their mental well-being. Findings highlight that, overall, participants experienced improved mental health well-being from baseline to mid- and end-of programme (p = 0.01 & 0.003), as well as one-year post-programme (p = 0.03). Qualitative data indicated the reconnection of participants with local communities, and with other people, in ways that improved their mental health well-being. These data highlight the effectiveness of using heritage as a means of improving the well-being of people with mental health issues.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1353-8292
Uncontrolled Keywords:mental health; well-being; heritage; World Heritage Sites; public health
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:33206
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:08 Jan 2020 11:22
Last Modified:10 Aug 2020 11:39

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -