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The costs of human elephant conflict: understanding local perceptions, vulnerabilities and impacts associated with human elephant conflict in Subulussalam, Aceh, Sumatra.

Twitcher, L., 2020. The costs of human elephant conflict: understanding local perceptions, vulnerabilities and impacts associated with human elephant conflict in Subulussalam, Aceh, Sumatra. Masters Thesis (Masters). Bournemouth University.

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Abstract

Human elephant conflict (HEC) poses a major threat to elephant conservation. As they lose their forest habitat, elephants are increasingly encountering humans and raiding farmland. Such events can be catastrophic for both local people and elephants, occasionally leading to fatalities. The importance of mitigating these conflicts is evident, but in order to do so effectively, the impacts of HEC on local communities needs to be better understood. This study investigates the costs associated with conflict between humans and Sumatran elephants in Subulussalam, Aceh, Indonesia, by interviewing 160 individuals in the region using semi- structured interviews. The results show both the visible (crop damage, property destruction) and hidden (psychological health, physical health, opportunity costs) impacts of HEC affecting the local people of Subulussalam. Individuals had experienced crop damage, and a majority expressed feelings of fear and anger towards elephants. There was also a sense of distrust of the government and abandonment by them, as individuals felt their suffering was being ignored. People were willing to try potential mitigation strategies to manage HEC, namely community group mitigation and chilli-grease fences. By understanding local perceptions, potentially successful and sustainable HEC mitigation can be put in place. Local people need to be involved in the planning and implementation of any such strategies, as they are the very people who will be impacted. By engaging with local communities, governing bodies and conservationists can work together with local people to build local tolerance towards elephants and achieve sustainable human-wildlife co-existence.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information:If you feel that this work infringes your copyright please contact the BURO Manager.
Uncontrolled Keywords:human elephant conflict; human wildlife conflict; sumatran elephant
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:33415
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:13 Feb 2020 15:29
Last Modified:13 Feb 2020 15:29

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