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Association between 12‐hr shifts and nursing resource use in an acute hospital: Longitudinal study.

Griffiths, P., Dall'Ora, C., Sinden, N., Jones, J. and Missed Care Study Group, , 2019. Association between 12‐hr shifts and nursing resource use in an acute hospital: Longitudinal study. Journal of Nursing Management, 27 (3), 502 - 508.

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DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12704

Abstract

Abstract Aim To evaluate whether ≥12‐hr shifts are associated with a decrease in resource use, in terms of care hours per patient day and staffing costs per patient day. Background Nurses working long shifts may become less productive and no research has investigated whether potential cost savings are realized. Method A retrospective longitudinal study using routinely collected data from 32 wards within an English hospital across 3 years (1 April 2012–31 March 2015). There were 24,005 ward‐days. Hierarchical linear mixed models measured the association between the proportion of ≥12‐hr shifts worked on a ward‐day, care hours per patient day and staffing costs per patient day. Results Compared with days with no ≥12‐hr shifts, days with between 50% and 75% ≥12‐hr shifts had more care hours per patient day and higher costs (estimate for care hours per patient day: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.28–0.36; estimate for staffing costs per patient day: £8.86; 95% CI: 7.59–10.12). Conclusions We did not find reductions in total care hours and costs associated with the use of ≥12‐hr shifts. The reason why mixed shift patterns are associated with increased cost needs further exploration. Implications for Nursing Management Increases in resource use could result in additional costs or loss of productivity for hospitals. Implementation of long shifts should be questioned.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0966-0429
Additional Information:Funding information: This study was funded by NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Wessex and by the NIHR HS&DR grant—13/114/17: Nurse staffing levels, missed vital signs observations and mortality in hospital wards: modelling the consequences and costs of variations in nurse staffing and skill mix. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Uncontrolled Keywords:12‐hr shifts; health resources; nurses; personnel staffing and scheduling; shift work schedule
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:34073
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:02 Jun 2020 15:50
Last Modified:02 Jun 2020 15:50

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