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Interaction design for paediatric emergency VR training.

Matthews, T., Tian, F. and Dolby, T., 2020. Interaction design for paediatric emergency VR training. Virtual Reality & Intelligent Hardware, 2 (4), 330 - 344.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.vrih.2020.07.006

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) in healthcare training has increased adoption and support, but efforts are still required to mitigate usability concerns. This study conducted a usability study of an in-use emergency medicine VR training application, available on commercially available VR hardware and with a standard interaction design. Nine users without prior VR experience but with relevant medical expertise completed two simulation scenarios for a total of 18 recorded sessions. They completed NASA Task Load Index and System Usability Scale questionnaires after each session, and their performance was recorded for the tracking of user errors. Our results showed a medium (and potentially optimal) Workload and an above average System Usability Score. There was significant improvement in several factors between users’ first and second sessions, notably increased Performance evaluation. User errors with the strongest correlation to usability were not directly tied to interaction design, however, but to a limited ‘possibility space’. Suggestions for closing this ‘gulf of execution’ were presented, including ‘voice control’ and ‘hand-tracking’, which are only feasible for this commercial product now with the availability of the Oculus Quest headset. Moreover, wider implications for VR medical training were outlined, and potential next steps towards a standardized design identified.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:2096-5796
Uncontrolled Keywords:Virtual reality; medical training; human-centred design; interaction design
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:34629
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:29 Sep 2020 08:45
Last Modified:29 Sep 2020 08:45

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