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The Promotion of Eating Behaviour Change through Digital Interventions.

Chen, Y., Perez-Cueto, F.J.A., Giboreau, A., Mavridis, I. and Hartwell, H., 2020. The Promotion of Eating Behaviour Change through Digital Interventions. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (20), 7488.

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DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17207488

Abstract

Diet-related chronic disease is a global health epidemic giving rise to a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. With the rise of the digital revolution, there has been increased interest in using digital technology for eating behavioural change as a mean of diet-related chronic disease prevention. However, evidence on digital dietary behaviour change is relatively scarce. To address this problem, this review considers the digital interventions currently being used in dietary behaviour change studies. A literature search was conducted in databases like PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Medline, and PsycInfo. Among 119 articles screened, 15 were selected for the study as they met all the inclusion criteria according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) search strategy. Four primary digital intervention methods were noted: use of personal digital assistants, use of the internet as an educational tool, use of video games and use of mobile phone applications. The efficiency of all the interventions increased when coupled with tailored feedback and counselling. It was established that the scalable and sustainable properties of digital interventions have the potential to bring about adequate changes in the eating behaviour of individuals. Further research should concentrate on the appropriate personalisation of the interventions, according to the requirements of the individuals, and proper integration of behaviour change techniques to motivate long-term adherence.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1660-4601
Uncontrolled Keywords:behaviour change ; digital health ; digital interventions ; eating behaviour ; health promotion
Group:Bournemouth University Business School
ID Code:34736
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:26 Oct 2020 12:42
Last Modified:26 Oct 2020 12:42

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