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Distraction by auditory novelty during reading: Evidence for disruption in saccade planning, but not saccade execution.

Vasilev, M. R., Parmentier, F.B.R. and Kirkby, J. A., 2020. Distraction by auditory novelty during reading: Evidence for disruption in saccade planning, but not saccade execution. arXiv (2011.00163 [q-bio.NC).

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Official URL: https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.00163v1

Abstract

Novel or unexpected sounds that deviate from an otherwise repetitive sequence of the same sound cause behavioural distraction. Recent work has suggested that distraction also occurs during reading as fixation durations increased when a deviant sound was presented at the fixation onset of words. The present study tested the hypothesis that this increase in fixation durations occurs due to saccadic inhibition. This was done by manipulating the temporal onset of sounds relative to the fixation onset of words in the text. If novel sounds cause saccadic inhibition, they should be more distracting when presented during the second half of fixations when saccade programming usually takes place. Participants read single sentences and heard a 120 ms sound when they fixated five target words in the sentence. On most occasions (p= 0.9), the same sine wave tone was presented ("standard"), while on the remaining occasions (p= 0.1) a new sound was presented ("novel"). Critically, sounds were played either during the first half of the fixation (0 ms delay) or during the second half of the fixation (120 ms delay). Consistent with the saccadic inhibition hypothesis, novel sounds led to longer fixation durations in the 120 ms compared to the 0 ms delay condition. However, novel sounds did not generally influence the execution of the subsequent saccade. These results suggest that unexpected sounds have a rapid influence on saccade planning, but not saccade execution.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:q-bio.NC; q-bio.NC
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:34792
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:10 Nov 2020 14:44
Last Modified:10 Nov 2020 14:44

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