Skip to main content

Zero Hours Contracts and Their Perceived Impact On Job Motivation of Event Catering Staff.

Filimonau, V. and Corradini, S, 2020. Zero Hours Contracts and Their Perceived Impact On Job Motivation of Event Catering Staff. Event Management, 24 (6), 735 - 752.

Full text available as:

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published version as stipulated by publisher.)
Event Management.pdf - Published Version

174kB

DOI: 10.3727/152599519X15506259855869

Abstract

© 2020 Cognizant, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Catering is a cornerstone of events. Motivating catering staff, who can be either permanent or “hourly paid” employees, represents an important managerial challenge, especially in the UK, where controversial zero hours contracts (ZHCs) prevail within the events industry. This article reports a representative case study of a London-based event catering company that relies upon ZHCs. In pursuit of corporate social responsibility (CSR) goals, directed at enhancing the well-being of employees and improving corporate image, the company considers replacing ZHCs with alternative contracts, but wishes to examine the potential impact of this intervention first. To aid in decision making, 18 indepth, semistructured interviews are conducted with company's managers and employees to examine the drivers of staff motivation and the perceived effect of ZHCs. The study finds that interpersonal relationships, remuneration rates, and perceived fairness of managerial treatment drive staff motivation in event catering. The major positive (flexibility and no mutual obligation) and negative (job insecurity and instable income) implications of ZHCs are well understood by employees. The internal (personal finances, family status, and individual lifestyles) and environmental (current job market situation and managerial abilities) circumstances determine the level of preparedness and the degree of willingness of event catering staff to accept ZHCs. Implications for policy making, professional practice, and future research are discussed.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1525-9951
Group:Bournemouth University Business School
ID Code:35007
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:04 Jan 2021 16:12
Last Modified:27 May 2021 07:57

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...
Repository Staff Only -