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Acoustic telemetry reveals strong spatial preferences and mixing during successive spawning periods in a partially migratory common bream population.

Winter, E.R., Hindes, A.M., Lane, S. and Britton, J.R, 2021. Acoustic telemetry reveals strong spatial preferences and mixing during successive spawning periods in a partially migratory common bream population. Documentation. Springer Nature. (Submitted)

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Abstract

Partial migration, whereby a population comprises multiple behavioural phenotypes that each have varying tendencies to migrate, is common among many animals. Determining the mechanisms by which these phenotypes are maintained is important for understanding their roles in population structure and stability. The aim here was to test for the temporal and spatial consistency of migratory phenotypes in a common bream Abramis brama (‘bream’) population, and then determine their social preferences and extent of mixing across three successive annual spawning periods. The study applied passive acoustic telemetry to track the movements of bream in the River Bure system of the Norfolk Broads, a lowland wetland comprising highly connected riverine and lacustrine habitats. Analyses revealed that individual migratory phenotype was highly consistent across the three years, but this was not predicted by fish sex or length at tagging. During the annual spawning periods, network analyses identified off-channel areas visited by both resident and migrant fish that, in non-spawning periods, were relatively independent in their space use. Within these sites, the co-occurrence of bream was non-random, with individuals forming more preferred and avoided associations than expected by chance. These associations were not strongly predicted by similarity in fish length, sex or behavioural phenotype, indicating that the resident and migrant phenotypes mixed during their annual spawning periods. The results suggested these different phenotypes, with spatially distinct resource use in non-spawning periods, comprised a single metapopulation, with this having important implications for the management of this wetland resource.

Item Type:Monograph (Documentation)
Additional Information:Part of E.R Winter integrated thesis
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:35080
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:27 Jan 2021 10:28
Last Modified:27 Jan 2021 10:28

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