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Core dimensions of food-related lifestyle: A new instrument for measuring food involvement, innovativeness and responsibility.

Brunsø, K., Birch, D., Memery, J., Temesi, Á., Lakner, Z., Lang, M., Dean, D. and Grunert, K., 2021. Core dimensions of food-related lifestyle: A new instrument for measuring food involvement, innovativeness and responsibility. Food Quality and Preference, 91, 104192.

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FQAP 2021 - Brunso et al - Core dimensions of food related lifestyle.pdf - Accepted Version
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DOI: 10.1016/j.foodqual.2021.104192

Abstract

Segmentation is crucial for targeting product development initiatives and marketing communication nationally as well as internationally. In this paper we use the Food Related Lifestyle instrument that has been applied in the food arena for many years as a ‘stepping stone’ to develop a contemporary, targeted and smaller version of the Food Related Lifestyle instrument, still following the original theoretical framework. In particular we focus on three dimensions that have proven to be of core value in segmentation: food involvement; food innovativeness; and, food responsibility. Based on data collection in six countries (DK, AU, HU, UK, USA and NZ) across two rounds from 2017 to 2019 (total N = 3396), we propose a new core instrument consisting of 15 items that have been tested for cross-cultural validity. Next, we used these three dimensions for segmentation across the six countries by applying multi-level latent class analysis. A solution leading to five different segments could be identified; the foodies, the moderates, the adventurous, the uninvolved and the conservatives. The segments were profiled by means of Schwartz’s ten value domains and measures of self-reported food-related behaviour to check for nomonological validity. We conclude that the 15 items were cross-culturally valid, could be used for segmentation across six countries, and that segment profiling by means of Schwartz values and behavioural items were in line with the theoretical background.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0950-3293
Uncontrolled Keywords:Lifestyle; Segmentation; Scale development; Cross-cultural
Group:Bournemouth University Business School
ID Code:35113
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:27 Jan 2021 15:02
Last Modified:22 Feb 2021 17:07

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