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Relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients: a pilot study.

Holmes, S.J., Allen, S.C. and Roberts, H.C., 2017. Relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients: a pilot study. International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 12, 1207 - 1212.

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DOI: 10.2147/COPD.S120721

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Older people with reduced respiratory muscle strength may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients without known airways disease. METHODS: Patients in acute medical wards were recruited who were aged ≥70 years; no history, symptoms, or signs of respiratory disease; Mini Mental State Examination ≥24; willing and able to consent to participate; and able to perform hand grip and forced spirometry. Data including lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate [PEFR], and slow vital capacity [SVC]), grip strength, age, weight, and height were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression unadjusted and adjusted (for age, height, and weight). RESULTS: A total of 50 patients (20 men) were recruited. Stronger grip strength in men was significantly associated with greater FEV1, but this was attenuated by adjustment for age, height, and weight. Significant positive associations were found in women between grip strength and both PEFR and SVC, both of which remained robust to adjustment. CONCLUSION: The association between grip strength and PEFR and SVC may reflect stronger patients generating higher intrathoracic pressure at the start of spirometry and pushing harder against thoracic cage recoil at end-expiration. Conversely, patients with weaker grip strength had lower PEFR and SVC. These patients may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1178-2005
Uncontrolled Keywords:grip strength ; older ; peak expiratory flow rate ; slow vital capacity ; spirometry ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging ; Diagnostic Errors ; Female ; Forced Expiratory Volume ; Geriatric Assessment ; Hand Strength ; Hospitalization ; Humans ; Linear Models ; Lung ; Male ; Peak Expiratory Flow Rate ; Pilot Projects ; Predictive Value of Tests ; Prospective Studies ; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive ; Spirometry
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:35128
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:01 Feb 2021 14:51
Last Modified:01 Feb 2021 14:51

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