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Sensory and physical characteristics of foods that impact food intake without affecting acceptability: Systematic review and meta-analyses.

Appleton, K. M., Newbury, A., Almiron-Roig, E., Yeomans, M. R., Brunstrom, J. M., de Graaf, K., Geurts, L., Kildegaard, H. and Vinoy, S., 2021. Sensory and physical characteristics of foods that impact food intake without affecting acceptability: Systematic review and meta-analyses. Obesity reviews, 22 (8), e13234.

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DOI: 10.1111/obr.13234

Abstract

This systematic review with meta-analyses aimed to identify the sensory and physical characteristics of foods/beverages which increase satiation and/or decrease/delay subsequent consumption without affecting acceptability. Systematic searches were first undertaken to identify review articles investigating the effects of any sensory and physical food characteristic on food intake. These articles provided some evidence that various textural parameters (aeration, hardness, homogeneity, viscosity, physical form, added water) can impact food intake. Individual studies investigating these effects while also investigating acceptability were then assessed. Thirty-seven individual studies investigated a textural manipulation and provided results on food intake and acceptability, 13 studies (27 comparisons, 898 participants) investigated effects on satiation, and 29 studies (54 comparisons, 916 participants) investigated effects on subsequent intake. Meta-analyses of within-subjects comparisons (random-effects models) demonstrated greater satiation (less weight consumed) from food products that were harder, chunkier, more viscous, voluminous, and/or solid, while demonstrating no effects on acceptability. Textural parameters had limited effects on subsequent consumption. Between-subjects studies and sensitivity analyses confirmed these results. These findings provide some evidence that textural parameters can increase satiation without affecting acceptability. The development of harder, chunkier, more viscous, voluminous, and/or solid food/beverage products may be of value in reducing overconsumption.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1467-7881
Uncontrolled Keywords:food intake; palatability; satiation; satiety; texture
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:35370
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:08 Apr 2021 06:46
Last Modified:28 Jul 2021 15:51

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