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Body temperature and physical performance responses are not maintained at the time of pitch-entry when typical substitute-specific match-day practices are adopted before simulated soccer match-play.

Hills, S. P., Aben, H.G.J., Starr, D.P., Kilduff, L.P., Arent, S.M., Barwood, M.J., Radcliffe, J.N., Cooke, C.B. and Russell, M., 2020. Body temperature and physical performance responses are not maintained at the time of pitch-entry when typical substitute-specific match-day practices are adopted before simulated soccer match-play. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 24 (5), 511 - 516.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.11.013

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To profile performance and physiological responses to typical patterns of match-day activity for second-half soccer substitutes. DESIGN: Descriptive. METHODS: Following a warm-up, 13 male team sports players underwent ∼85min of rest, punctuated with five min rewarm-ups at ∼25, ∼50, and ∼70min, before ∼30min of simulated soccer match-play. Countermovement jump performance (jump height, peak power output), alongside 15m sprints, were assessed post-warm-up, and pre- and post-simulated match-play. Core temperature, heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, and blood glucose and lactate concentrations were measured throughout. RESULTS: Warm-up-induced core temperature elevations (∼2.3%, +0.85°C; p<0.001) were maintained until after the first rewarm-up. Thereafter, core temperature was reduced from post-warm-up values until pre-simulated match-play (∼1.6%, -0.60°C; p<0.001), where values were similar to pre-warm-up (37.07±0.24°C, p=0.981). Simulated match-play increased core temperature progressively (p≤0.05) but values remained lower than post-warm-up (∼5min; p=0.002) until ∼10min into exercise. From post-warm-up to pre-simulated match-play, sprint times (∼3.9%, +0.10s, p=0.003), jump height (∼9.4%, -3.1cm; p=0.017), and peak power output (∼7.2%, -296W; p<0.001) worsened. Despite increased ratings of perceived exertion and elevated blood lactate concentrations (p≤0.05), sprint times were maintained throughout exercise, whereas peak power increased (∼7.8%, +294W; p=0.006) pre- to post-exercise. CONCLUSIONS: At the point of simulated pitch-entry, body temperature and physical performance responses were not maintained from warm-up cessation despite typical substitute-specific match-day practices being employed in thermoneutral conditions. Evidence of performance-limiting fatigue was absent during ∼30min of simulated match-play. These data question the efficacy of practices typically implemented by substitutes before pitch-entry.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1440-2440
Uncontrolled Keywords:football; intermittent; jump; rewarm-up; sprint; warm-up
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:35595
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:15 Jun 2021 14:19
Last Modified:15 Aug 2021 08:29

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