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Evidence for improved prognosis of colorectal cancer diagnosed following the detection of iron deficiency anaemia.

Almilaji, O., Parry, S.D., Docherty, S. and Snook, J., 2021. Evidence for improved prognosis of colorectal cancer diagnosed following the detection of iron deficiency anaemia. Scientific Reports, 11 (1), 13055.

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DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-92623-z

Abstract

Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common in colorectal cancer (CRC), especially, in right-sided CRC which is known to have an overall worse prognosis. The associations between diagnostic pathway (Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP), IDA, symptomatic) and tumour side/stage was assessed using logistic regression models in 1138 CRC cases presenting during 2010-2016 at a single secondary-care centre in the UK. In the IDA sub-group, the relationship between CRC stage and the event of having a blood count prior to CRC diagnosis was examined using Bayesian parametric survival model. IDA was found as the only significant predictor of right-sided CRC (OR 10.61, 95% CI 7.02-16.52). Early-stage CRC was associated with both the IDA (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.18-2.29) and BCSP pathway (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.75-3.37). At any age, the risk of detecting CRC at late-stage was higher in those without a previous blood count check (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% credibility interval 1.08-2.14). The findings of this retrospective observational study suggest a benefit from diagnosing CRC through the detection of IDA, and warrant further research into the prognosis benefit of systematic approach to blood count monitoring of the at-risk population.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:2045-2322
Additional Information:Funding PhD studentship (OAM) jointly funded by Poole Hospital Gastroenterology Research fund and Bournemouth University.
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cancer models; Cancer screening; Colorectal cancer; Statistics
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:35727
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:05 Jul 2021 11:31
Last Modified:15 Aug 2021 08:29

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