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How does a narrative understanding of change in families post brain injury help us to humanise our professional practice?

Whiffin, C. J and Ellis-Hill, C., 2021. How does a narrative understanding of change in families post brain injury help us to humanise our professional practice? Brain Impairment. (In Press)

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DOI: 10.1017/BrImp.2021.14

Abstract

In this paper we critically explore the discourse of change post brain injury and challenge the dominant discourse of negative change which alone leaves little room for other perspectives to exist. These negative changes pose a considerable risk to the well-being of families who may benefit from engaging in richer accounts making room for a more coherent and connected sense of self and family post-injury. We explore how narrative approaches provide opportunities for all practitioners to expand their professional scripts and support families to move toward a future which is not dominated by a discourse of loss. While loss and negative change is an important, and very real consequence, of brain injury, focusing purely on stories of loss is life limiting for family members and can cause psychological distress. The life thread model is offered as a visible tool for all practitioners to engage with and use while working with families; providing a concrete focus for reflection and discussion of narratives relating to change which otherwise can feel quite abstract in everyday practice. We argue that one way we can humanise our professional practice is to support all practitioners to engage in a narrative understanding of family change following ABI.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1443-9646
Uncontrolled Keywords:Brain Injury; Family; Narrative; Humanising; Change
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:36026
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:20 Sep 2021 10:13
Last Modified:28 Sep 2021 12:40

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