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The role of memory and perspective shifts in systematic biases during object location estimation.

Segen, V., Colombo, G., Avraamides, M., Slattery, T. and Wiener, J., 2021. The role of memory and perspective shifts in systematic biases during object location estimation. bioRxiv (05.29.446288).

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DOI: 10.1101/2021.05.29.446288

Abstract

Our previous research highlighted a systematic bias in a spatial memory task, with participants correctly detecting object movements in the same direction as the perspective shift, whilst misjudging the direction of object movements if those were in the opposite direction to the perspective shift. The aim of the current study was to investigate if the introduction of perspective shifts results in systematic biases in object location estimations. To do so, we asked participants to encode the position of an object in a virtual room and to then estimate the object’s position following a perspective shift. In addition, by manipulating memory load (perception and memory condition) we investigated if the bias in object position estimates results from systematic distortions introduced in spatial memory. Overall, our results show that participants make systematic errors in estimating object positions in the same direction as the perspective shift. This bias was present in both the memory and the perception condition. We propose that the systematic bias in the same direction as the perspective shift is driven by difficulties in understanding the perspective shifts that may lead participants to use an egocentric representation of object positions as an anchor when estimating the object location following a perspective shift, thereby giving rise to a systematic shift in errors in the same direction as the perspective shift.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review. This forms part of the integrated thesis of Vladislava Segen. It has been submitted for publication in Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:36054
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:05 Oct 2021 08:24
Last Modified:05 Oct 2021 08:24

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