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A brief report informing the adaptation of a Behavioural Activation intervention for delivery by non-mental-health specialists for the treatment of perinatal depression.

Pinar, S., Ersser, S., Macmillan, D. and Beford, H., 2022. A brief report informing the adaptation of a Behavioural Activation intervention for delivery by non-mental-health specialists for the treatment of perinatal depression. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. (In Press)

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Abstract

Abstract Background: Behavioural activation (BA) is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines for the treatment of perinatal depression; however, there is limited evidence about whether it is effective when delivered by non-mental-health specialists (NMHS) in a perinatal setting in the UK. Aims: This study aimed to adapt a BA intervention manual and guided self-help booklet intended for delivery by NMHSs for the treatment of perinatal depression. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 15 women and 19 healthcare professionals (HCP) within the first study element. Four experience-based co-design (EBCD) workshops were held, with the involvement of 14 women and three HCPs, to modify the BA documents for the specific needs of perinatal women. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings: The findings from the study elements were presented with themes. The co-designers (women and HCPs) pointed out that having sleeping problems, changes in appetite, feeling exhausted and feeling emotional, may be experienced by non-depressed mothers as well during pregnancy or in the postpartum period, especially around the fourth day after giving birth. Therefore, it was important to differentiate these feelings with depression. The women also wanted to see an example for each activity before being asked to do it. Having examples would help them to see the possibilities before creating their own diary sheets or tables of activities. Conclusions: Aside to the tool adaptation, the findings of this study provide the foundation to assess the effectiveness of the adapted intervention in a subsequent feasibility trial.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:1352-4658
Uncontrolled Keywords:perinatal depression;behavioural activation;adapting manualised treatment;behavioural therapy;modifying psychological intervention
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:36937
Deposited By: Symplectic RT2
Deposited On:17 May 2022 15:01
Last Modified:17 May 2022 15:01

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